Role of information professionals in helping patrons assess trust?

ASIST 2006
General Discussion

  • Educate and give information about security and privacy problems to patrons;
  • Learn more about trust ourselves;
  • try to understand patrons perspective, cultural and otherwise;
  • People need to be wary of sources -- check facts, even of sources you think are trusted;
  • In creating information systems, ensure information is secure;
  • "Librarian's like to search and everyone else likes to find". As librarians we are inclined to find the most accruate, timely information. However, depending on information need, a thorough, exhaustive search is not always necessary. This method may wind up pushing people away (e.g. Wikipedia for quick and dirty information about a topic;

    response: most patrons can find the quick and dirty information, so if they come to information professionals, it is our responsibility tin enculcate idea that accuracy is important
    response: leads to a marketing opportunity for us to teach patrons the value of quality informationresponse:Credibility is decreased if don't give patrons the correct answer from the start
    response: is it our responsibility to find the best information or train patrons to find and assess information (i.e. self-reliance and responsiblity). We have to stop picking on/dismiss Google and give patrons tools to find good informationresponse: key is to instill awareness of assessing a quality information source

  • Is information good information or the best information?
    Example: when buying a car, consult Consumer Reports but another person will only want to be sure front seat is comfortable.
    response: speaks to information needs and fundamentals of a reference interview
    response: patrons may avoid a librarian who spends too much time finding the *perfect* piece of informationresponse: Democracy of trust is exemplified with Google's popularity. The more people use a source, the more it is trusted

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