Evaluated by the same rigorous standards as papers submitted for the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, the best student research paper is judged on technical competence, significance of findings, originality and clarity of expression.  The Award recognizes the outstanding work of a current student in a degree-granting program in the information field and has been sponsored by Pratt Institute since 1996.

Past recipients of the Pratt-Severn Best Student Research Paper Award:

YearWinner
2018Ella Milken Detro
“A Librarian’s Guide to Algorithmic Bias”
2017Natalie Ornat
Reading for your Life: The Impact of Reading and Writing During the Siege of Sarajevo 
2016Deidre Alyse Whitmore
Seeking Context: Archaeological Practices Surrounding the Reuse of Spatial Information
2014Curt Arledge
Filled-in vs. Outline Icons: The Impact of Icon
2013Hilary Zelko
Reasoning About Relevance
2012April Lynne Earle
Design of an Application Profile for the St. John's University Oral History Collection
2011Brooks Breece
Local Government Use of Web GIS in North Carolina
2009Katie O'Leary
Information Seeking in the Context of a Hobby: A Case Study of a Young Adult with Asperger's Syndrome
2008Ann K. Irvine (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
Natural Language Processing and Temporal Information Extraction in Emergency Department Triage Notes
2005Mary Gabehart
An Analysis of Citations to Retracted Articles in the Scientific Literature
2004Tori Orr (Drexel University)
Review of Literature: Representing Personal Histories in a Social Context
2002Elizabeth Zogby (Drexel University)
Representing Oral History: Challenges and Opportunities for Content-Based Retrieval
2001Brian Hilligoss (University of North Carolina)
The Role of Web Home Page Information Elements in User-Site Orientation Efforts
2000Karen Weaver (University at Albany, SUNY)
Cataloging Internet Resources at MIT and UC San Diego Libraries
1999Kelly Maglaughlin (University of North Carolina)
Use of Relevance Criteria
1997Melinda Axel (Drexel University)
Data Warehouse Design for Pharmaceutical Drug Discovery Research
1996Mark Spasser (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
The Enacted Fate of Undiscovered Knowledge
1995Jin Zhang (University of Pittsburgh)
A Tool for the Visualization of Information Retrieval
1992Corinne Jorgensen (Syracuse University)
Problem Statements and Information Need
1990Charlotte Weise (University of Pittsburgh)
An Examination of Two Computational Approaches to Reasoning by Analogy
1989Dale Boles (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
The Effect of Subject Matter Familiarity on Inter-Indexer Consistency, Number of Index Terms Supplied and Indexer Use of Author Terminology
1988Charlotte Weise and Stuart McLean (University of Pittsburgh)
DIGRESS: A Deductive Interface to a Relational Database
1987Dudee Chiang (University of Illinois)
Application of Bradford Distribution to Online Search Results: An Online Bibliometric Study
1986P.F. Anderson (University of Michigan)
Technological and Non-Technological Gatekeepers: An Overview of the Literature
1985Becky Brass (University of Minnesota)
Structural Analysis as as framework for Understanding and Coping with the Threat of Special Library Mortality
1984Susan Hayles (University of Minnesota)
Memory Functions in Reference Search Strategies: Observations from Verbatim Accounts of Searches in Process
1982Donna Rubens (University of Minnesota)
Cognitive Strategy and the Search Process: A Four-Fold Dual Context Memory Representation
1981Christine L. Borgman (Stanford University)
Theoretical Approaches to the Study of Human Interaction with Computers
1980Janet L. Chapman (Drexel University)
A State of Transition Analysis of Online Information-Seeking Behavior
1979Brigitte Huybrechts (University of Maryland)
The Impact of Information on the Decision-Making Process
1978Virginia Kosanovic (University of California, Berkeley)
A Statistical Survey of Chemical Engineering Journals: In-House Library Use, Citation Analysis and the Use of Parameter Weighting for Ranking and Evaluation
1977Judy Chow (University of California, Los Angeles)
A Radical Pattern Assembling Method for Creating Kanji (Chinese Ideographs) for an Online Japanese Bibliographic Information Retrieval System
1976Patricia J. Zimmerman (Case Western Reserve University)
Principles of Design for Information Systems
1974Linda C. Smith (Georgia Institute of Technology)
Systematic Searching of Abstracts and Indexes in Interdisciplinary Areas
1973Suzanne M. Strong (Ohio State University)
An Algorithm for Generating Structural Surrogates of English Text
1972Vera Melnyk (Syracuse University)
Man-Machine Interface: Frustration