GeoInformatician

Indiana University’s School of Informatics and Computing defines informatics as “putting technology to work to solve complex problems. If that sounds like computer science to you, the two fields are indeed related. Informaticians deal with utilizing information technology within the contexts of other disciplines: healthcare, biology, music, and environmental science, to name just a few. As computers have spread from laboratories to our workplaces, homes, and nearly every aspect of modern life, a corresponding need to adapt and optimize both hardware and software to these various areas has similarly developed.

Informatics is a particularly lucrative field for those with strong interdisciplinary interests. Geoinformatics is a good field for anyone who has excellent computer skills as well as a strong interest in Geography. Geomaticians may work with Geographic Information Systems, Remote Sensing data, Global Positioning systems and more. Geomaticians gather, store, process or deliver geographic or spatially referenced information. Geomaticians work in a variety of fields including health care, marketing, urban planning, environmental science, meteorology and others.

Education: Usually a Bachelor’s degree in Geomatics, GIS, Geography, or related discipline (e.i. Urban Planning, Environmental Studies.

Skills: Excellent Computer Skills including advanced knowledge of ArcGIS software and components. Some programing such as Python, PHP, Visual Basic or Javascript may be required.


Medical Informaticist

Indiana University’s School of Informatics and Computing defines informatics as “putting technology to work to solve complex problems. If that sounds like computer science to you, the two fields are indeed related. Informaticians deal with utilizing information technology within the contexts of other disciplines: healthcare, biology, music, and environmental science, to name just a few. As computers have spread from laboratories to our workplaces, homes, and nearly every aspect of modern life, a corresponding need to adapt and optimize both hardware and software to these various areas has also developed.

Informatics is a particularly lucrative field for those with strong interdisciplinary interests. One of the most common types of informaticians are Medical Informaticians. This is a good field for anyone who is interested in both health care and computing. Physicians who have good computing skills might be interested in medical informatics. A related field, nursing informatics, brings informatics into the nursing field. Also health care informatics might appeal to those who are interested in auxiliary health care fields, such as public health, pharmacy or consumer health to name just a few.

Education: To be a medical or nursing informaticist you generally would need to be trained as either a physician (for medical informatics) or a registered nurse (for nursing informatics) and take training to become board certified as an informaticist. This is especially true for informaticians in a clinical setting. Other health informatics positions may require a degree in the field being studied and additional informatics training, for example in pharmacy or public health and other may require a bachelor’s or graduate degree in Health Informatics.

Skills: As above. Medical or Nursing training with appropriate board certification for clinical informaticists or other appropriate health care degree or Degree in Health Informatics with certification by AMIA.

Outlook: Employment of physicians and surgeons is projected to grow 18 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations. Job growth will occur because of the continued expansion of healthcare-related industries.Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Interviews: Omolola Ogunyemi