Friday, November 6

8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Every organization creates and acquires information to fulfill its purpose. How an organization perceives the information that it creates and acquires – and the value it attaches to it – drives its organizational management response. Many organizations respond to their information with minimal, unsystematic management structures, while other organizations create units and employ professionals to manage organizational information through all five of the recognized information management functions: information technology, libraries, archives, knowledge management and records management. For these professionals and their organizational units to be effective, at least two things are necessary. First information professionals in these functions must be educated before their employment. Second, once employed, these information professionals must fulfill their functional responsibilities with regard to organizational information – their professional jurisdictions – in distinctive yet complementary ways.

This workshop will directly address the impact on organizations of professional information work done across a variety of functions. It will deepen understanding of each function’s jurisdiction and their interfaces and expand discussion into education for these functions. This full-day workshop is divided into two sessions featuring chief information officers (CIOs), educators, archivists, librarians, knowledge managers and records managers.

In the morning session, participants will present and lead discussions on the following issues:

  • What do information technology professionals and chief information officers contribute to their organizations?
  • What is the scope of their responsibilities?
  • In light of these issues, what education do CIOs and their reports in the information technology functions need to prepare for employment and then to do the work itself?
  • How do CIOs and information technology professionals influence university curricula and continuing education?
  • What education do professionals in the other four information management functions – libraries, archives, knowledge management and records management – need to prepare for employment and to do the work itself?
  • How do these functions influence the information education curricula of academic institutions?
  • To what degree does this education emphasize an integrated view of these functions?
  • In the afternoon session, guests will lead discussions on these questions:
  • How do CIOs and information technology professionals relate to the other professional information management jurisdictions within their organizations?
  • What unique information functions do CIO and IT jurisdictions contribute to their organizations?
  • How do these functions influence one another and the other four information functions in their organizations?
  • Where do these jurisdictions fit in the organization’s management structure?
  • How do the other four information professional jurisdictions relate to the CIO and IT jurisdictions?
  • What unique contributions do these other four information professional jurisdictions make to their organizations?
  • How do these functions influence one another in their organizations?
  • Where do these jurisdictions fit in the organization’s management structure?

Organizers:  Bill Edgar, Missouri State University; and Deanna Morrow Hall, Corporate Information Resources, Inc.


Fees:
Early bird:  Non-Members $120, ASIS&T Members $100, SIG/MGT Members $90
Regular:  Non-Members $135, ASIS&T Members $115, SIG/MGT Members $105