Tuesday, 15:30

 

Media Format Matters: Users’ Perceptions of Physical versus Digital Games

Jin Ha Lee, Dylan Holmes, Brooks Lobe
University of Washington Information School, United States of America

Summary

Despite the rapid shift in media distribution from physical to digital formats, few studies explore what this means to users with regards to perceived values, limitations, and experience with media. We investigate this problem, specifically within the context of video games, aiming to understand which formats game players prefer and for what reasons, and the implications for game content providers and digital libraries. The findings from a survey of 1,257 game players showed that more respondents preferred digital formats over physical formats. Advocates of digital games typically valued accessibility and convenience, longevity of games free of physical damage, less need for storage, and reduced cost. Advocates of physical games generally valued the ability to easily retrieve, share, and resell games, ownership and longevity of access to games, the paraphernalia and collectibles that came with physical games, and the aesthetic and tangible qualities of the physical object. We discuss the implications of these findings for content providers and libraries, with an emphasis on game preservation efforts.


Personality, Motivations, and Information Quality: A Comparative Study across Games for Human Computation

Ei Pa Pa Pe-Than, Dion Hoe-Lian Goh, Chei Sian Lee
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Summary

The popularity of games has motivated their adoption for pursuits beyond entertainment. One of the emerging strategies is the Human Computation Game (HCG) which channels players’ time spent on games toward problem solving. Unlike entertainment-oriented games, players of HCGs contribute output as a byproduct of gameplay. As such, there are many factors such as personality, motivations, quality, as well as gameplay styles that may influence adoption of HCGs. In this paper, we investigate the relationships between personality traits and motivations, and the differences in perceived information quality across HCGs with collaborative and competitive gameplay styles. Using a within-subjects experimental design, 125 participants were recruited from two local universities. The findings demonstrate that the interaction between personality traits and gameplay styles influenced players’ satisfaction of the need for autonomy, competence and relatedness,. Further, perceived information quality was found to differ across HCG types. The findings provide design guidelines for HCGs and similar games to enhance players’ engagement and motivation.


Games for Crowdsourcing Mobile Content: An Analysis of Contribution Patterns

Dion Goh, Ei Pa Pa Pe-Than, Chei Sian Lee
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Summary

Crowdsourcing of mobile content has become a major way of populating information-rich online environments. One approach to motivate participation is via games. That is, a crowdsourcing game is built upon the desire of individuals to be entertained while generating useful outputs as byproducts of gameplay. A gap in current research is that actual usage patterns of crowdsourcing games have not been investigated adequately. We address this gap by comparing content creation patterns in a game for crowdsourcing mobile content against a non-game version. Our analysis of 3024 contributions in both apps reveal 10 categories, divided into: (1) those that conform more to the notion of mobile content utilized to learn about a specific place or for navigational purposes; and (2) those that were about the content creator himself/herself, or in relation to other users or other non-playing individuals, with the location as a backdrop, similar to status updates in social media platforms like Twitter. We argue that both categories are potentially useful in that they meet different needs, and together could serve to recruit and sustain participation in the longer term. Further, the distribution of categories varied across the apps, indicating that the features afforded by games shape behavior differently from non-game-based approaches to crowdsourcing.