Friday, March 3, 2017

Register Now!OCLC Conference Center

Lakeside Room
6565 Kilgour Place
Dublin, Ohio 43017-3395 US
Maps and Directions

 

Program & Schedule
8:30-9:00amArrival, check-in and social
9:00-9:15amIntroduction & Welcome by ASIS&T President Lynn Silipigni Connnaway
9:15-9:45amDeveloping Services to Support New Needs: Academic Librarians’ Experiences with Research Data Management Programs , Ixchel Faniel
9:45-10:15amEvolving Support for Research Information Management, Rebecca Bryant
10:15-10:30amCoffee Break
10:30-11:30amThe Library in the Life of the User, Lynn Silipigni Connaway
11:30-12:30pmLibrary Linked Data: Where Things Stand, Jean Godby
Afternoon Workshops (choose one)
1:30-5:00pmVisitors and Residents Interactive Mapping Exercise Workshop, Lynn Silipigni Connaway and William Harvey
1:30-5:00pmTaxonomy Workshop, Joseph Busch
Tour
5:15-5:45pmTour of OCLC Facility (Kilgour Building)

9:15-9:45am

Developing Services to Support New Needs: Academic Librarians’ Experiences with Research Data Management Programs

Evolving to meet new needs within scholarly communities, academic libraries have begun to provide programs to support scholars’ research data management (RDM) needs. Many believe that librarians are uniquely suited to support scholars throughout the research cycle—from the inception of a research project to the dissemination of results. This presentation highlights findings from a qualitative study examining librarians’ RDM experiences. Interviews with academic library professionals in the United States indicate five factors of influence that facilitate or constrain RDM activity: 1) technical resources, 2) human resources, 3) researchers’ perceptions of the library, 4) leadership support, and 5) communication, coordination, and collaboration. A discussion of the implications these factors have on librarians’ continued worked in RDM follows.

Presenter
faniel-bioIxchel M. Faniel

Ixchel M. Faniel, Ph.D., is a Research Scientist at OCLC Research with prior experience at the University of Michigan, IBM, and Andersen Consulting (now Accenture). Her interests include improving how people discover, access, and use/reuse content. She examines how academics manage, share, and reuse research data and librarians’ experiences designing and delivering supportive research data services. She also examines how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students from grade school to grad school identify and judge the credibility of digital resources in order to help shape student-centered information literacy instruction. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

9:45-10:15am

Evolving Support for Research Information Management

US universities are increasingly engaging in complex efforts to collect and synthesize information about their institutional research footprint through the establishment of research information management (RIM) infrastructure—also often called Current Research Information Systems (CRIS). RIM implementation includes the collection, maintenance, and sharing of bibliographic research outputs and integration of this metadata with internally sourced information, such as faculty appointments, research grants, and courses taught. Institutions are implementing RIM in many ways, such as through integration with the campus institutional repository to support open access, creation of public profiles to support expert discovery, and the development of faculty activity reporting workflows to support annual review and information aggregation. In this presentation, I will discuss the functional drivers of RIM adoption in the US as well as the complex and collaborative ways in which libraries are engaging with diverse campus stakeholders.

Presenter
Rebecca BryantRebecca Bryant

Rebecca Bryant, Ph.D., serves as Senior Program Officer at OCLC Research where she leads and develops areas related to research information management and research support services, contributing to the thematic focus on Research Collections and Support. She previously served as Project Manager for Researcher Information Services in the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she led a campus-wide effort to implement the Elsevier Pure research information management system (RIMS). She has also served as Director of Community at ORCID where she led outreach initiatives to encourage the adoption of ORCID identifiers throughout the scholarly communications community. Prior to ORCID, Dr. Bryant spent a decade in the University of Illinois Graduate College as Assistant Dean where she led numerous initiatives to support early career researchers, implemented Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), and served on a campus-wide project team to collect assessment data for the National Research Council Assessment of Research Doctoral Programs.

10:30-11:30am

The Library in the Life of the User

Lynn Silipigni Connaway will discuss the research findings from the OCLC User Studies research area that brings to light the need for libraries to become embedded in the lifestyles of their users and potential users, especially in an environment where libraries are only one among many places to get information. In the session, Connaway will highlight OCLC user studies research completed within the past 12 years and summarize a recent report that builds on findings from this work to emphasize the need for libraries to develop a plan for integrating the library into the life of the user. This ongoing research provides the library community with behavioral evidence about individuals’ perceptions, habits, and requirements. In turn, this evidence can support the efforts of libraries to design services around user expectations that have been influenced by consumer technologies and evolving research and learning environments.

Presenter
Lynn Silipigni ConnawayLynn Silipigni Connaway

ASIS&T President, Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist and Director of User Research, leads the User Studies Activities at OCLC Research. Lynn has held visiting research positions and an endowed chair for research at several international universities. She has received research funding from the IMLS in the US and Jisc, and the Arts and Humanities Research Council in the UK. Connaway is co-author of the 4th and 5th editions of Basic Research Methods for Librarians, the 2017 publication of the 6th edition of Research Methods in Library and Information Science, and has authored numerous other publications. She received her doctorate in LIS from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her MLS from the University of Arizona. Lynn has been a member of ASIS&T since she was a doctoral student. She also is a member of the Central Ohio ASIS&T Regional Chapter, the ASIS&T SIG USE, and the Digital Libraries SIG, was a Director-at-Large on the ASIST Board 2012-2015, and has served on various ASIS&T committees including Co-Chair of the 2011 ASIS&T Annual Conference.

11:30-12:30pm

Library Linked Data: Where Things Stand

This presentation is an environmental scan of linked data projects in the library sector. Starting with a brief overview of linked data concepts and OCLC’s contributions, it describes the state of the art by addressing several questions. Why is linked data a good fit for the description of library resources? Where has most of the effort been invested? And what is the relevance of linked data for library patrons? The answers to these questions are illustrated with projects mentioned in OCLC’s Library Linked Data Survey, conducted by Karen Smith-Yoshimura in 2015.

Presenter
Godby-bioCarol Jean Godby

Carol Jean Godby is a Senior Research Scientist at OCLC, where she has been responsible for directing projects with a focus on automated content analysis that produce research prototypes, open source software, improvements to national and international standards, and enhancements to OCLC’s data architecture. She has a Ph.D. in Linguistics from The Ohio State University. Since 2010, she has been a member of a research and development team at OCLC whose charter is to develop a next-generation data architecture based on the principles of Linked Data.


Afternoon Workshops (choose 1)

1:30-5:00pm

Visitors and Residents Interactive Mapping Exercise Workshop

This interactive session includes an exercise for attendees to visualize their information use and modes of engagement with technology and sources in both their personal and professional lives based on the Visitors and Residents (http://www.oclc.org/research/themes/user-studies/vandr.html) continuum. The outcomes help us identify how we engage with technology personally, professionally, and individually and to better understand our identity and interactions with others and technology. The exercise also provides a framework for librarians and information professionals to identify how target audiences engage with technology and discover and access information in order to modify existing services and systems and to develop new ones. OCLC Research also has developed an app for mapping engagement with technology on most smart phones, tablets, and laptops with a short instructional video that is available at http://experimental.worldcat.org/vandrmapping/signin

Presenters
Lynn Silipigni ConnawayLynn Silipigni Connaway

ASIS&T President, Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist and Director of User Research, leads the User Studies Activities at OCLC Research. Lynn has held visiting research positions and an endowed chair for research at several international universities. She has received research funding from the IMLS in the US and Jisc, and the Arts and Humanities Research Council in the UK. Connaway is co-author of the 4th and 5th editions of Basic Research Methods for Librarians, the 2017 publication of the  6th edition of Research Methods in Library and Information Science, and has authored numerous other publications. She received her doctorate in LIS from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her MLS from the University of Arizona. Lynn has been a member of ASIS&T since she was a doctoral student. She also is a member of the Central Ohio ASIS&T Regional Chapter, the ASIS&T SIG USE, and the Digital Libraries SIG, was a Director-at-Large on the ASIST Board 2012-2015, and has served on various ASIS&T committees including Co-Chair of the 2011 ASIS&T Annual Conference.

William HarveyWilliam Harvey

William Harvey is a Consulting Software Engineer at OCLC Research as of 2015.  He received his Ph.D. and M.S. in Computer Science from The Ohio State University in 2012, where he studied analysis and visualization of high-dimensional data using Morse theory and other topological approaches.  Prior to graduate school, William was a research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory where he worked primarily on computer vision and machine learning problems. William graduated from the University of Washington in 2004 with a B.S. in Computer Science and a B.A. in Russian Language and Literature.  With more than 13 years of professional experience in software engineering and an extensive mathematics and advanced computer science background, William continues to enjoy the wealth of challenges and beautiful insights that reside at the intersection of these areas (e.g., homotopy type theory).

Currently, William is working with Lynn Silipigni Connaway on the Visitors and Residents project.  He is also working with Ixchel Faniel on the DIPIR project, where he analyzes and creates visualizations of clickstream data to better understand the role of contextual information in facilitating data reuse, creation, and preservation.

1:30-5:00pm

Taxonomy Workshop

Tagging content in simple ways provides enormous flexibility in how the content can be searched for and retrieved later, and how the content can be published by content management systems now and in different formats and locations in the future. The model promotes rich tagging instead of guessing what the best place is to park content in a single location in a large directory structure. The model promotes the reuse of existing vocabularies from around organizations, and focuses any unique subject topic development and maintenance effort on specific purposes. This is a half-day face-to-face workshop that will provide some best practices in content taxonomy development, and facilitate a set of hands-on activities that will focus on developing sets of categories to describe 1) products and services, 2) audience segments and sub-segments, and 3) specific types of and names for categories to find and use products and services – the basic building blocks for a content taxonomy.

Presenter
josephbuschJoseph Busch

Joseph A. Busch is the founder of Taxonomy Strategies and the principal consultant. Before founding Taxonomy Strategies, Joseph Busch held strategic positions at Interwoven, Metacode Technologies, the Getty Information Institute and PriceWaterhouse. He is a Past President of the Associaton for Information Science and Technology (www.asis.org), and past member of the Board of Directors of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (dublincore.org).


5:15-5:45pm

Tour of OCLC Facility (Kilgour Building)

OCLC Tour: Tour OCLC’s newly renovated headquarters building, including the OCLC Data Center and the OCLC Library, Archives and Museum. You’ll see unique items in the OCLC Library, including Melvil Dewey’s hand-penned notes in the first edition Classification and Subject Index for a Library, and a museum illustrating OCLC’s rich history. You’ll also visit the OCLC Data Center and hear about the OCLC Operations Command Center, the support center for OCLC products and services. More about OCLC is at www.oclc.org.


Register Now!Registration Rates

$60 – Members
$80 – Non-Members
$35 – Students

Sponsored by OCLC, Kent State, the Central Ohio Chapter and the Northern Ohio Chapter of ASIS&T.

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