EDITOR’S SUMMARY

ASIS&T SIG/MET held the METRICS 2016 workshop on October 14, 2016, in Copenhagen, Denmark. Topics covered during the workshop include informetrics, information retrieval, bibliometrics and scientometrics, especially as they apply to evaluation of individuals and scholarly work. Nine presentations were given at the full-day workshop, as well as seven posters, three of which were open posters. The end of the event included presentation of the Best Student Paper award, a staple in the METRICS workshop, and the prize winners were invited to discuss their papers at the event. The SIG/MET Best Paper Award sponsored by Altmetric.com and Digital Science was awarded to Dangzhi Zhao and Lucinda Johnson for their case study To What Degree Are Uni-citations Perfunctory? A Case Study.

KEYWORDS

workshops
information science
scientometrics
bibliometrics
evaluation


SIG/MET

METRICS 2016: Workshop on Informetric and Scientometric Research

by Adèle Paul-Hus and Antoine Archambault

On October 14, 2016, SIG/MET, the special interest group of ASIS&T for the measurement of information production and use, held its sixth annual workshop during the Association’s Annual Meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark. The METRICS 2016 workshop was organized by SIG/MET chair Stefanie Haustein, University of Montreal, and officers Isabella Peters, ZBW Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, and Timothy D. Bowman, Wayne State University. Twenty-three participants attended the full-day event which comprised nine presentations, four peer-reviewed posters and three open posters. METRICS 2016 presentations and posters covered the topics of bibliometrics, scientometrics, informetrics and information retrieval, more specifically focusing on metrics application in the context of individuals’ evaluation as well as authoring, reading, citing and mentioning scholarly work.

Figure 1. Attendees of the METRICS 2016 workshop at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting in Copenhagen

Figure 1. Attendees of the METRICS 2016 workshop at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting in Copenhagen

The workshop opened with a session revolving around the topic of the individual evaluation of researchers. Fei Shu presented his proposal for a new indicator, the M-score. This indicator, based on citation distribution properties, aims at improving the inconsistencies and lack of accuracy of the H-index. The presentation raised an animated discussion among the workshop’s participants on the need for caution when using single indicators at the individual level. Mikko Tuomela, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, presented an author names disambiguation web service, Author-ity Exporter, developed with co-authors Brent Fegley and Vetle Torvik. The tool, which also contains the geo-localization of authors’ affiliation, allows the study of geo-temporal movement of researchers during their career. Philippe Mongeon, University of Montreal, introduced a new method to detect sequences of alphabetical order in scientific papers’ bylines. In his study, co-authored with Elise Smith, Bruno Joyal and Vincent Larivière, Mongeon demonstrates that a more accurate identification of alphabetical sequences allows for a better operationalization of “middle authors” in bibliometric studies.

In the session focusing on reading, citing and online mentioning of scholarly work, Kim Holmberg, University of Turku, presented via Skype an analysis of the effects of open access on altmetric events related to Finnish research publications. The work in progress, done in collaboration with Timothy Bowman and Fereshteh Didegah, found great disciplinary differences in accumulated altmetric events but no clear advantage for open access publications. Judit Bar-Ilan, Bar-Ilan University, with co-authors Gali Halevi and Elsa Anderson, investigated the potential relationship between usage and publication of journals. More specifically, the case study sought to find if researchers from Mount Sinai hospital were reading the journals they published in. The analysis did not find significant correlation between the most used journals, in terms of views and downloads and the ones in which researchers most published. A study presented by Dangzhi Zhao and Lucinda Johnston, University of Alberta, aims at providing an efficient method to filter perfunctory citations since these non-necessary citations constitute a serious source of noise in citations analysis. Zhao and Johnston found that, contrary to their hypothesis, removing citations that appear only once in a paper is not an effective method to filter-out perfunctory citations.

In total, seven posters were presented during the day. Rafael Aleixandre-Benavent, Antonia Ferrer-Sapena, Antonio Vidal-Infer, Adolfo Alonso-Arroyo, Enrique Alfonson Sánchez-Pérez and Fernanda Peset, University of Valencia, presented an analysis of open-data policies regarding raw data availability in journals. The authors also studied the relation between the aforementioned policies and the impact factor. Keiko Yokoi, University of Tokyo Library, investigated the current status of open access journals’ sustainability using data from Ulrichsweb. Noriko Sugie, Surugadai University, presented a statistical analysis of users’ information-seeking patterns measured through the movement of RFID-tagged items inside the Chiyoda Public Library. Lastly, Lourdes Castelló-Cogollos, Rafael Aleixandre-Benavent and Rafael Castelló-Cogollos, University of Valencia, examined endogamy indicators to study the relationship between supervisors involved in the academic assessment of Spanish theses. This year, once again, in addition to peer-reviewed poster submissions, participants were invited to bring posters for the open poster session. Three authors responded to the invitation and presented their latest findings during the open poster session.

Figure 2. From the left, SIG/MET chair Stefanie Haustein with Best Student Paper Award winners Adèle Paul-Hus and Philippe Mongeon

Figure 2. From the left, SIG/MET chair Stefanie Haustein with Best Student Paper Award winners Adèle Paul-Hus and Philippe Mongeon

As in previous editions of the METRICS workshop, outstanding student contributions were recognized by SIG/MET with its Best Student Paper Award, sponsored by Elsevier. Recipients of the prize were invited to present their work during the meeting. The winner was Adèle Paul-Hus, University of Montreal, for her paper co-authored with fellow Ph.D. student Philippe Mongeon and Maxime Sainte-Marie. The study, which analyzes collaboration patterns by combining authorship and acknowledgements data, showed that the important differences traditionally observed between disciplines in terms of team size are greatly reduced when acknowledgees are taken into account. Antoine Archambault and Philippe Mongeon, University of Montreal, won second place for their paper co-authored with advisor Vincent Larivière. In their study, they analyze the scholarly output of a cohort of German researchers before and after the country’s reunification in 1990. Their results show that East German researchers who had direct ties with the West such as scientific collaboration or indirect ties such as publications written in English or citations from Western researchers had better chances of surviving the transition. Jennifer Pierre, University of California, Los Angeles, received an honorable mention for her analysis of professor-student relationships using web analysis measurement of mentorship impact, which she presented via Skype.

Figure 3. SIG/MET Best Student Paper Award Runner Up. From the left, SIG/MET chair Stefanie Haustein with Best Student Paper Award 2nd place winners Antoine Archambault and Philippe Mongeon

Figure 3. SIG/MET Best Student Paper Award Runner Up. From the left, SIG/MET chair Stefanie Haustein with Best Student Paper Award 2nd place winners Antoine Archambault and Philippe Mongeon

Finally, the workshop concluded with the SIG/MET Best Paper Award, sponsored by Altmetric.com and Digital Science. The organizing committee was pleased to award Dangzhi Zhao and Lucinda Johnston for their contribution entitled “To What Degree Are Uni-citations Perfunctory? A Case Study.”

Figure 4. SIG/MET Best Paper Award winner Dangzhi Zhao with SIG/MET chair Stefanie Haustein

Figure 4. SIG/MET Best Paper Award winner Dangzhi Zhao with SIG/MET chair Stefanie Haustein

More information about SIG/MET, which was named SIG of the Year by ASIS&T, and about the METRICS 2016 workshop can be found on the SIG’s website at www.asist.org/SIG/SIGMET. Follow SIG/MET on Twitter (https://twitter.com/sig_met) and subscribe to the mailing list (http://mail.asis.org/mailman/listinfo/sigmetrics).

 


SIG/MET METRICS 2016

Program
Evaluating individuals

Fei Shu. M-score: An Improvement of the H-index in Terms of the Consistency and Accuracy

Mikko Tuomela, Brent Fegley and Vetle Torvik. Introducing the Author-ity Exporter, and a Case Study of Geo-temporal Movement of Authors

Philippe Mongeon, Elise Smith, Bruno Joyal and Vincent Larivière. The Contribution of Middle Authors to the Production of Knowledge in the Biomedical Field

Poster session – Peer-reviewed posters

Rafael Aleixandre-Benavent, Antonia Ferrer-Sapena, Antonio Vidal-Infer, Adolfo Alonso-Arroyo, Enrique Alfonson Sánchez-Pérez and Fernanda Peset. Journals’ Policies of Storage and Reuse of Raw Research Data and Their Impact in Five Scientific Areas

Keiko Yokoi. The Sustainability of Open Access Journals: The Situation Regarding Open Access Journals Launched Between 2000 and 2014

Noriko Sugie. Clustering of Library Users by Similarity of Visiting Paths Using Location Information

Lourdes Castelló-Cogollos, Rafael Aleixandre-Benavent and Rafael Castelló-Cogollos. Measuring with Indicators the Endogamy in the Academic Assessment Boards of PhD Theses

Reading, citing and mentioning online

Gali Halevi, Judit Bar-Ilan and Elsa Anderson. Are Researchers Reading the Journals They Publish In? A Case Study Of Icahn School Of Medicine Scientists

Dangzhi Zhao and Lucinda Johnston. To What Degree Are Uni-Citations Perfunctory? A Case Study

Kim Holmberg, Timothy Bowman and Fereshteh Didegah. Open Access Advantage? An Altmetric Analysis of Finnish Research Publications

Student session – Best student paper awarded by Elsevier

Adèle Paul-Hus, Philippe Mongeon and Maxime Sainte-Marie. The Sum of It All: An Analysis of Team Size Using Authorship and Acknowledgement Data

Antoine Archambault, Philippe Mongeon and Vincent Larivière. German Reunification and Its Effects on Researchers’ Publication Patterns

Jennifer Pierre. Assessing Professor/Student Relationships through Web Analysis for Measurement of Mentorship Impact


Adèle Paul-Hus is an information sciences PhD candidate at the École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l’information, Université de Montréal. Her doctoral research focuses on acknowledgement functions within the scholarly communication process. She can be reached at adele.paul-hus<at>umontreal.ca or found on Twitter via @adelepaulhus

Antoine Archambault is an information sciences PhD student at École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l’information, Université de Montréal. His doctoral research focuses on the usage of scientific journals in academia and on collection development. He can be reached at antoine.archambault<at>umontreal.ca