Discovery Services Librarian

As always libraries require professionals to manage the integrated library system. With more users becoming used to the search features found in eCommerce sites such as Amazon, users have demanded a seamless  and faceted search interface similar to the search interface they have come to expect from these sites. This has led to the development of Discovery Systems. Discovery Systems work on top of Integrated Library Systems to create user friendly search systems and integrate a libraries electronic resources. To manage these systems a new library role has been created, that of Discovery Services Librarian.

To be a Discovery Services Librarian you need excellent technical skills especially in XML and metadata standards such as Dublincore, METS,and MODS.  You should also have good web programming skills and knowledge of development tools, especially APIs. You should also have experience administering discovery systems (Primo, Summon, Encore) and link resolvers (Sfx, LinkSource) and proxy servers. A knowledge of cataloging and acquisitions workflows, and issues surrounding copyright and licensing are also useful.

Skills: XML, metadata standards such as DublinCore. Knowledge of web based programming languages and development tools. Familiarity with Integrated Library Systems, proxy servers, link resolvers and electronic resources management systems. Knowledge of content management systems such as Drupal is helpful. Knowledge of non-Marc metadata is also helpful.

Average Salary (OOH): Librarians average $26.62/Hr. Discovery positions tend to be higher than average.

Outlook (OOH): Outlook for librarians as a whole is slower than average. However retirements are anticipated. Technological skills improve employment prospects as well as provide entry into faster growing professions (for example Webmaster) (OOQ -Winter 2000/2001)


Bibliometrics and Research Impact Librarian

Universities are increasingly becoming interested in quantifying the impact that their research has. With their traditional interest in bibliometrics, librarians are a perfect fit for analyzing research impact and to train faculty members and graduate students to use tools to measure their own research impact.

Bibliometrics and Research Impact Librarian have strong foundations in numeracy, statistics, and bibliometrics, which is the science of measuring scholarly output. skills. They are familiar with issues surrounding scholarly communication and research impact, have excellent communication and instruction skills These individuals often serve as the point person in the library and a key person on campus for bibliometrics and research impact and likely will be training faculty and students to use bibliometrics tools and how to interpret metrics.

Education: Requires an ALA accredited Master’s of Library Science (U.S. and Canada) or a CILIP accredited library science program or training course (UK).

Skills: Requires excellent research skills. Requires excellent knowledge of copyright and scholarly communication. Requires excellent knowledge of issues surrounding bibliometrics and analyzing research impact.  Requires strong data analyzing and bibliometrics skills using tools such SciVal,  Google Scholar Citations, Publish or Perish, Symplectic, ORCID, Researcher ID.

Average Salary: Librarians average $26.62/Hr. This is a hot specialty in 2015, so well-qualified candidates will command a higher salary.

Outlook: Employment of librarians is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. However retirements are anticipated. Technological skills improve employment prospects as well as provide entry into faster growing professions. Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Research Data Management Librarian

With the development of new technologies, academic libraries are finding themselves taking on new roles such as creators of digital content, content publishers and content curators including curators of research data.

Interest in institutional repositories is increasing as University administrators see the potential that institutional repositories hold for promoting the research output of an institution as well as the potential they hold for streamlining the tenure and promotion process. This includes datasets produced as a result of research. Additionally, funding bodies are increasingly stipulating that publically funded research as well as research datasets be made freely available, often in an open repository.

The proliferation of interest in research data has resulted in the creation of a new breed of librarian, the Research Data Management Librarian. A Research Data Management Librarian should have excellent technological skills, especially in managing and manipulating data, digital asset management systems and open journal systems software as well as a excellent command of issues surrounding open source publishing and scholarly communication. They should also have excellent communication skills as they will often find themselves in the role of promoting and educating users about the role the library plays in curating research data as well as obtaining “buy in” from institutional stakeholders.

Education: Requires an ALA accredited Master’s of Library Science (U.S. and Canada) or a CILIP accredited library science program or training course (UK).

Skills: Requires excellent research skills. Requires excellent knowledge of copyright and scholarly communication. Requires excellent knowledge of issues surrounding open access. Requires strong technical skills such as programming languages (XML, CSS, Javascript, SQL, MySQL) metadata standards (DublinCore, OAI, Premis etc.), Digital Asset Management Systems (Islandora, ContentDM) Statistical and GIS software (such as SPSS and Stata or ArcGIS) as well as software to manage other types of research data and Database Storage and Distribution systems (such as Hadoop)

Average Salary (OOH): Librarians average $26.62/Hr. Research Data Management Librarians make slightly higher than average.

Outlook (OOH): Outlook for librarians as a whole is slower than average. However Retirements are anticipated and technological skills improve employment prospects as well as provide entry into faster growing professions (OOQ -Winter 2000/2001)


Metadata Librarian

Libraries and businesses require professionals to organize and classify information resources to provide easy and accurate access to information, and professional librarians with excellent technical skills are in demand as metadata librarians.

Metadata librarians use standards to describe a wide variety of items in their work. Fluency and experience in Extensible Markup Language (XML), which is now employed on the web, is critical, as well as being able to think abstractly in defining new ways to describe collections of things, using taxonomies or standard vocabularies.  This is detail-oriented work, and metadata librarians who develop complementary technical skills in programming, user experience are able to grow their careers more broadly into technology work in the libraries and businesses in which they work.

Skills: Experience with a range of metadata standards, vocabularies and web technologies . Familiarity with integrated library systems. Some positions might require experience with linked data and semantic web applications. Some positions may require experience with digital repositories.

Average Salary: Librarians average $26.62/Hr. Certain metadata librarian positions may be higher than average, especially positions requiring stronger technical skills.

Outlook: Employment of librarians is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. However retirements are anticipated. Technological skills improve employment prospects as well as provide entry into faster growing professions. Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Interviews: Jacob ShelbySoraya Assar


E-Learning Librarian

These days patrons prefer to have access to library resources wherever and whenever they want and this includes information literacy resources as well.

E-learning Librarians require excellent communication skills and excellent information literacy and pedagogical skills. You should have teaching experience usually from working as a teaching and learning librarian or as a teacher librarian. You should have good technical skills especially with developing e-learning content using course or learning management systems and with using web development tools such as Camtasia. Knowledge of web development languages such as Javascript is also useful.

Education: Requires an ALA accredited Masters of Library Science (U.S. and Canada) or a CILIP accredited library science program or training course (UK).

Skills: Requires excellent teaching and pedagogical skills. Requires experience or training in teaching. Requires knowledge of copyright, licensing and scholarly communication issues (especially in academic libraries). Requires strong technical skills such as programming languages CSS, Javascript, SQL, MySQL) web development tools (especially Camtasia or Captivate) and course management or learning management systems.

Average Salary: Librarians average $26.62/Hr. (U.S.)

Outlook: Employment of librarians is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. However retirements are anticipated. Technological skills improve employment prospects as well as provide entry into faster growing professions. Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Interviews: Michael Rodriquez


Digital Initiatives Librarian

While most libraries still house books, libraries increasingly subscribe to electronic content which is available to their users 24/7 and provide digital services available to their users wherever they finds themselves. In addition, with the development of new technologies, libraries are also finding themselves taking on new roles such as creators of digital content, content publishers and curators of digital content as well as distributors of digital content and services.

The role of digital librarian has evolved into a role that overseas all of the many digital services that a library can provide and in larger libraries often now serves as the head of a large departments which overseas everything from acquiring and providing access to digital content, managing the creation of the libraries website, managing digital services such as virtual reference and creation of digital information literacy courses, digitizing library and archival collections and much more.

Digital Initiatives Librarians have excellent communication skills as they will often need to communicate closely with a diverse number of stakeholders. They should have excellent technological skills including a knowledge of Web development and programming, a knowledge of Digital Asset Management Systems and Digital Repository administration, and a good knowledge of metadata standards. They should have a good overall knowledge of the types of digital services provided in libraries as well as a good knowledge of the issues surrounding the provision of digital content. For example a good knowledge of copyright and licensing issues is always helpful!

Education: Requires an ALA accredited Masters of Library Science (U.S. and Canada) or a CILIP accredited library science program or training course (UK).

Skills: Requires excellent research skills. Requires excellent knowledge of copyright and scholarly communication issues. Requires excellent knowledge of archival procedures.  Requires strong technical skills such as programming languages (XML, CSS, Javascript, SQL, MySQL) metadata standards (DublinCore, EAD, OAI, Premis etc.), Digital Asset Management Sytems (Islandora, ContentDM) Digital Repository Software (Dspace), and/or Database Storage and Distribution systems (Hadoop), Familiarity with digital publishing technologies and digitization technologies. Good project management skills.

Average Salary: Librarians average $26.62/Hr. Digital Librarians make somewhat higher than average.

Outlook: Employment of librarians is projected to grow 7 percent from 2012 to 2022, slower than the average for all occupations. However retirements are anticipated. Technological skills improve employment prospects as well as provide entry into faster growing professions. Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Interviews: Yves Maurer, Pascal Calarco


Digital Asset Manager

Growing out of the combination of archival science and information technology, the digital asset manager (DAM) or digital archivist deals primarily with the preservation and storage of born-digital materials, and digitized copies of analog materials. While physical repositories are still alive and well, archives of born-digital and digitized materials are becoming common, ranging from small private collections to large scale initiatives like Project Gutenberg and Google Books.

The most exciting aspect of working in digital asset management is the newness of the field. While paper-based records have been around for decades, the history of their electronic equivalents spans mere decades. These technologies are constantly evolving, which means DAMs need to stay up date with technologies and materials need to be migrated to the newest file and storage formats to ensure future access. While a physical book can’t “crash” or be “erased” per se, these are legitimate concerns for information in electronic form. Thus backup copies in other locations help ensure that the data remains safe. Perhaps the biggest problem is the youth of digital: History has shown us that paper can last for hundreds of years, while digital data hasn’t existed long enough to prove similar longevity. Thus digital asset management is very much an evolving field, and those involved in it must be adaptable to new technologies and meticulous with regards to data organization and migration.

Education: Usually at least a Bachelor’s degree, sometimes a Master’s degree in Computer Science, Information Science, Library Science, or Archival Science. Corporations are more likely to ask for a Computer Science or Information Science backgrounds. Educational and heritage institutions might also specify Library or Archival Science backgrounds.

Skills: Knowledge of digital asset management and/or media asset management systems. Some examples might include Islandora, ContentDM (libraries) and Cortex or NetXposure. Knowledge of Metadata Standards. Some knowledge of programming and database technologies. Knowledge and familiarity of different file formats and their uses and characteristics. Knowledge and experience with digital capture technologies (hardware and software) for a variety of formats (depending on industry or institution)

Outlook: Digital Asset Managers do not fit cleanly into a standard occupational category, with some skills from Archives, Database Administrators, and Web Developers. Employment of this area is likely projected to grow 20 percent from 2012 to 2022, faster than the average for all occupations, due to the growing demand of managing digital content.

Interviews: Yves Maurer